Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Honeysuckle Berries



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All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Eastern Fence Lizard



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All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Monday, September 28, 2009

Bird's Nest Fungi

If I believed in Fairies, I would imagine that I would spot them hanging around these cute little Bird's Nest Fungi.  The director of OAC pointed them out, growing around the Garage Studio.

They really do look like tiny birds' nests, complete with little tiny eggs! I have a feeling these will be featured in a future painting or drawing of mine.  They are far too amazing not to find a way to use them.

Everyday, there is something fascinating to discover here!

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All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Southern Green Frog



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All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Saturday, September 26, 2009

Courting the Muse

After three weeks of settling in and wandering about O.A.C., I have received inspiration for some new paintings.  I know I am most certainly inspired, because I spent the entire day working on the painting and had to force myself to stop and get some dinner!

Now I am sleepy and will soon retire for the night, but I know I will be up early and back working on the painting...as it always happens when the Muse graces me with her light.

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DoAn Art is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization. Contributions for the purposes of DoAn Art must be made payable to Fractured Atlas and are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law. 


All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Friday, September 25, 2009

Cabin Studio Porch



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All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Moving Forward: First Quarter

The moon has moved from its dark phase and now begins the first quarter or waxing phase.  With increasing light of moon, energy too is increasing. Your monthly projects are taking shape and your plans should be in motion.  However, just like any project that has been started, obstacles and challenges will arise.

The First Quarter energy reminds you to take a moment to re-evaluate your course of action and determine whether you should continue on as planned or to redirect your path.   If you followed the guidance of the New Moon, you will have taken time to rest and gather strength, so you should have the stamina to alter your path should you find it necessary or plug away as you have.

As the moon moves ever closer to its Full phase, we will find our energy continuing to grow and our projects coming closer to fruition.  Let the moon guide you.  It's a giant reminder above showing you that work can be accomplished in a healthy and balanced way, which is the path of true productivity. 

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All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Red-Spotted Purple Butterfly (limenitis arthemis)




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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Indian Pipe (monotropa uniflora)


The Indian Pipe (also known as the Ghost Plant, or Corpse Plant) is a rather unusual flower. It contains no chlorophyll and cannot manufacture its own food by photosynthesis, instead it is a parasitic plant that feeds on the beneficial fungi that grow in tree roots. Indian Pipes are found in dark, damp wooded areas, and it is the combination of growing conditions and specific food source that makes this plant an uncommon find.

Most Indian Pipes are a ghostly white color. This pink specimen I found is quite rare, with a red variety being the most rare of all. It is a fascinating flower, with waxy, almost translucent leaves and petals. It looks more like an alien species than something that would grow naturally on earth. It just goes to show you how mysterious and wonderful the natural world we live in really is!

Bumblebee's love the flower's pollen!

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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Autumn Equinox: Giving Thanks

photo by DoAn
Today is the autumnal equinox, which marks when we experience an equal number of light and dark hours. After today, the days grow shorter and the nights grow longer
Traditionally, the autumnal equinox also marked the end of the annual harvest and was (and in some countries still is) an important event in agricultural societies, bringing with it a feeling of completion and abundance. For those dependent on growing their own food, it indicated the coming of the darker days of winter and reminded them of the need to show gratitude for a plentiful harvest. It was the true observance of Thanksgiving.


The traditional American holiday of Thanksgiving falls in November, and many cultures see this time of harvest as a time of giving thanks. After all, this is when the year's work can really be measured. The American Thanksgiving holiday was originally celebrated on October 3rd, which is much closer to the autumnal equinox. President Roosevelt moved the holiday later in the year, as a way to help boost post-Depression holiday sales. This is another example of how we have lost touch with natural cycles and rhythms.


For those living in urban areas, the equinox may seem to be no more than just another day on the calendar. But, no matter where we are, we all can sense the changes occurring. The temperatures cool more rapidly, the angle of light changes, and daylight gets scarcer. We may even find ourselves turning inward and becoming more reflective, as the chillness of the evenings, draw us inside earlier and earlier, similar to the way our ancestors retreated from the long days of labor in the fields, preparing for the coming season of cold and darkness.


One need not identify with any particular religion or faith to feel the change that marks the turning of season. After all, this is not about religious practice, but simply connecting to the richness of life that embraces us all. The outward symbols of the autumnal equinox are visible all over in Western consumer society, even though few people realize that the decorations and activities echo the traditions of ancient peoples. The autumn colors, the decorative corn, and the rich warming soups are remnants the old way of life, a life that was aware of the crucial role nature played.


Why not join me in experiencing a more mindful and deeper connection to the shifting of the season by engaging in some activities that celebrate the true Thanksgiving:

  • Give thanks to those who have been a blessed presence in your life in the past year.
  • Give thanks to the Earth, who without its unceasing generosity, you would not exist.
  • Give thanks to the darkness, for without darkness, there is no light. Without night, there is no day. Despite our conditioning to overlook the dark, there are many positive aspects to embracing the dark side, if only for a short time.
  • Take a walk in nature (a local park will do) and say “good rest” to the trees that are about to enter their dormant stage. Reflect on all the things trees give to us: food, wood, paper, etc. Trees give and give regardless of our appreciation or not. Why not say thanks?
  • Think of ways to honor the Earth. Perhaps begin a family recycling plan, or consider reducing energy consumption, or find ways to reuse more materials rather than just throwing things away, or other environmentally friendly activities.
  • Go apple (or pear) picking with friends and/or family. Taste freshly made cider, or make apple pies and share slices with your neighbors. (The other day I helped prepare freshly picked pears for canning and today I made spiced pear muffins and gave them to the staff of O.A.C.)
  • Visit the graves of your ancestors and share stories of their lives.
I hope you find more in life during this autumnal equinox than just another day to mark off the calendar. Imagine how much richer life can be when we pause to give thanks to all the things that sustain us throughout the year? Perhaps if more people take time to appreciate all that nature provides, people will find it less acceptable to treat the Earth with such disregard and disrespect.

Thanks to all my patrons, collectors, and readers for all your support. Without you, my work would be quite lonely and often impossible to do! I appreciate the myriad of things you give to me!

DoAn
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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Monday, September 21, 2009

All Creatures Great and Small...




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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Common Wood Nymph (cercyonis pegala)




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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Sunrise in Belle, Missouri



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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Friday, September 18, 2009

Late Bloomers




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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Exploring Cycles: New Moon


Because of my interest in exploring and connecting to natural cycles and rhythms, I thought it would be appropriate to officially begin the process and share my journey at the start of the New Moon phase. In ancient Celtic tradition, the beginning of a cycle is it the dark time. For example, the day begins at sunset, not at midnight, and so the beginning of the lunar cycle is when the moon is dark.

Energetically, the time of the new moon calls for introspection and meditation and to reflect on your accomplishments of the previous month. The new moon can then be a time of being rather than doing, a time to rest and prepare for the next cycle where energy will increase and action will begin again.

I believe, for me, the previous lunar cycle was focused mainly on my getting to O.A.C. and getting settled in here. I spent the last week wandering about the grounds (I have probably only covered about a quarter of the land so far!) and just connecting to the energy and abundant life here. Sometimes I just sat and observed or read in different locations of O.A.C. and other times I sketched or took photos. Over the next week, I will reflect on my being here and meditate on my plans for what I will work on through the next lunar cycle.

It makes sense to me to incorporate a regular interval quiet time in our lives. So much of our society is focused on constant production and a striving to attain goals at all costs, which, I think, is unhealthy. It is impossible to be constantly productive (and I believe it's unnecessary), because eventually productivity fails when a person becomes exhausted, burned out, and depleted of all resources. Yet despite this, society pushes us ever harder to live up to this impossible notion. However, if someone wants to be truly productive (in a healthy way), there needs to be a period of rest and reflection. Without such a time, we are more apt to become depleted and spin off into directions that may not necessarily be appropriate for our goals. I can think of a lot of examples in my own life or in America where this is just what has happened!

Why not join me during this time to let things go for a week? Stop doing and just be for a little while. Reflect on the last month and the work you have been doing. Examine whether you are on track with your goals, or if an adjustment is needed. Rest. Meditate. Give thanks for what you have, so that you can begin the next phase with renewed energy and focus for the next cycle ahead. Avoid thinking of this time as a waste. It is a critically important part of a natural and healthy cycle that promotes growth and balance in any endeavor. I look forward to seeing you with me in the dark!

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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Grandmother Spider


One of the first animals you will encounter while at O.A.C. is the spider. In the morning the yard outside the studio is covered with dew-jeweled funnel spider webs nestled in the grass, and great spans of beautiful webs hanging between trees. It is impossible to walk through the woods without walking into the invisible sticky strands over and over.

Webs of all sizes, spiders tiny and large, dull and colorful can be found all over the land of O.A.C. I took the time one day to sketch a beautiful specimen of the species argiope aurantia also called the Black and Yellow Garden Spider, or The Corn Spider, or the Golden Orb Weaver (though the latter name is officially reserved for another spider in the same family). This is a large spider, its abdomen alone easily 3/4 inches long! I was lucky to witness this spider hurry over to an insect that became trapped in its web, wrapping it in silk, then injecting it with its poison before carrying the mummified insect back to the center of the web where it waits patiently for the next victim. It is a spider harmless to people, but deadly to any flying insect that is unlucky enough to get stuck in the sticky strands of its web.

The Osage Arts Community is named after the Native People who once lived on this land before they were forced to move to northeastern Oklahoma in 1870. I have learned that the symbol of the Osage people was the spider, as this story, found on the website: First People -- The Legends illustrates:
One day, the chief of the Isolated Earth [Osage] people was hunting in the forest. He was also hunting for a symbol to give life to his people. He came upon the tracks of a huge deer.The chief became very excited.
"Grandfather Deer," he said,"surely you will show yourself to me."You are going to become the symbol of my people."
He began to follow the tracks. His eyes were on nothing else as he followed those tracks, and he ran faster and faster through the forest. Suddenly, he ran right into a huge spider's web that had been strung between the trees, across the trail. When he got up, he was very angry. He struck at the spider who was sitting at the edge of the web. But the spider jumped out of reach. Then the spider spoke to the man.
"Grandson," the spider said, "why do you run through the woods looking at nothing but the ground?"
The chief felt foolish, but he had to answer the spider. "I was following the tracks of a great deer," the chief said. "I am seeking a symbol of strength for my people."
"I can be such a symbol,"said the spider.
"How can you be a symbol of strength?" said the chief. "You are small and weak, and I didn't even see you as I followed the great Deer."
"Grandson," said the spider, "look upon me. I am patient. I watch and I wait. Then all things come to me. If your people learn this, they will be strong indeed."
The chief saw that this was so. Thus the Spider became one of the symbols of the people.
The Osage people may have been forced to walk the trail of tears away from the land they called home, but their symbol, the spider, remains patient, proud, and silently waiting...

DoAn
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All artwork and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Perchance to dream...


The Dream Studio, a small simple building nestled amidst a growth of trees and shrubs, was built upon an old foundation found by the director of O.A.C. He built the walls, putting large windows on every wall and a sliding glass door, so that one can sit inside on the carpeted floor, or the soft, pillowed bed and meditate on the beauty of nature that surrounds you.

Lizards visit frequently, and appropriately, as they represent the shadow side of reality, where dreams are reviewed before manifested into the physical world.

Inside, beside the bed, stands an easel, and a small table with books that were published at the same time as the foundation was poured (I believe it was marked 1930). Candle holders and a brass plate sits on the floor where one can burn candles and light incense, to further create a meditative space.

The last few days I have been spending a couple hours in the afternoon to read and watch the birds and animals as they go about their day. It is a powerful spot, where creativity has the potential to be courted and nurtured.

DoAn
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All artwork, photos and text © Copyright 2005-2009 DoAn Art (Antony Galbraith) unless indicated otherwise. All Rights Reserved. Any downloading, copying or use of images on this website is strictly prohibited without express written consent by Antony Galbraith.

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